Savage Model 99c Owners Manual

Posted on by
Savage model 99 owners manual pdf
  1. Savage Model 99 Disassembly Instructions
  2. Savage Model 99c Owners Manual Pdf
  3. Savage Model 99c Owners Manual Download
Instead of getting into models and variations I thought Id take down a few 99s and have a look at the changes made to them over the years from when John Marlin was putting them out for Savage in 1896 right up till they were discontinued. When a rifle goes through over 750 different procedures before its made into a rifle some things are going to change over such a vast span of age and manufacturing, here are some of mine which are an 1895, an 1899 pre-90,000, a pre-mil 99 308 and an A series 99C 22-250.

The Model 99, and its predecessor model 1895, is a series of hammerless lever action rifles created by the Savage Arms Company in Utica, New York.The Model 99 featured a unique rotary magazine.The rifle was extremely popular with big game hunters and was even issued to the Montreal Home Guard during the First World War. Have a look at the manual Savage Arms Rimfire Bolt Action Mark I, Mark II, 93, Striker Instructions Manual online for free. It’s possible to download the document as PDF or print. UserManuals.tech offer 6 Savage Arms manuals and user’s guides for free. Share the user manual or guide on Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Safe ow n e rship is your re s p o n s i b i l i t y. Please thoroughly.


Cocking indicators:
One of the main things that distinguish the 99 from any other gun is that its action was solely internal and the brilliant addition of the cocking indicator. Back in 1896 when John Marlin was running Savages model 1895 in his plant the cocking indicator was found inside the bolt itself and displayed an S for safe or a C for cocked (pic A). It didnt take an expert to realize if his rifle was cocked or not. A simple lift of the head and a look at the bolt and all was known. After Savage began forging his own barrels and manufacturing his guns at his plant he moved the cocking indicator for the new fangled model 1899 from the hole to a small rectangular indicator that popped up when it was cocked (pic B). This new addition in my eyes was not a big difference but made things more complicated with the smaller parts needed, if theres one thing us collectors know its that our pre-90,000 rifles are sometimes missing the indicator, thats due to a tiny spring underneath it being lost which in time lets the indicator itself fall out. The serial range of this indicator was from 10,000 to 89,999 roughly. There was a big improvement in the Savage line at the 90,000 range, the actions were starting to be heat treated and made stronger and the cocking indicator was moved from the bolt back to behind the bolt on the upper tang of the receiver. It was a small pin that popped up when cocked and was flush to the action when uncocked (pic C). This indicator stuck and went right to the A series rifles and to the end of the 99s existence.

Safeties:

While there is no great difference in the early years of the 99s safeties there were some changes. The model 1895 safety was simply a lever safety which was a bent piece of metal with a round pin attached and when slid forward would lock the trigger and hold the action from being cycled (pic D). On the model 1899 the round pin was squared and the lever was opened up exposing the area where the safety slid into. (pic E) and pretty much stayed that way except for being shortened somewhat on the later pre-mil 99s (pic F). The dreaded tang safety made its debut at the 1,000,000th 99 manufacture. Personally I love the tang safeties on my hunting 99s but most collectors wince at the sight of a 99 with one due to some guys believing Savage ruined the lines of the 99 by adding it. I find it easier to slide the tang safety forward than fumbling around with the lever safety (pic P).


Inside the action:
As you can see from the internal view of the Savage lever action they were a simple, basic action which can easily be accessed by just taking the butt stock off. This rifle has got to be the easiest rifle to clean, you open up all the internals and can clean them more properly and thoroughly by this method. When people ask if they can adjust their 99s trigger the answer is no BUT what you can do is polish up the sear where it meets the hammer. Polishing these two meshing parts will ease up the trigger pull weight without having to do any major work to your gun. As you can see in the next picture, the 1895s (J) sear is a lot bulkier than the 1899 and the 99 sears (K 1899, L 99). You can also see from this angle that the 1895 trigger was rounded off and closed over the sear but the 1899 and 99 were opened up and exposed on the end of the trigger where it met the sear. This shot is also good for pointing out the difference in the upper tangs of the 1895, 1899 and the 99. After the 90,000 serial number again the upper tangs were lengthened. This makes a big difference for those of you who would like to restock that old 1899. If your 1899 is a pre-90,000 serial number you will need to find or order a stock specifically for that rifle. Most stocks you find today are for 90,000 and above due to the sheer numbers of them that were produced. If you were to order a stock from say Boyd's or another replacement stock maker you would want to definitely mention this in your questioning.
In this next picture you now see the differences between the A series tang safety 99 and the pre-mil Savage 99. Notice how many more internal parts there now are in the new A series rifles (Q). The tang safety itself takes up a lot of room and covers the view of the sear and bolt mechanism. If you notice on the lever of the A series the small nub that sticks up off the side of it, the safety catches this nub and denies the lever from opening. On the pre-mil 99 (R) the tell tale damascened bolt of the 900,000 serial range rifles. These rifles were also allowed to be slip closed which just means you could close the action on this 99 without having to dry fire it at the end of the year when you put it away and taking the tension off the mainspring of the hammer. I assume this is one of the main reasons why the pre-mil rifles were liked so much more than the tang safety models. Another noticeable Savage trademark is the case hardening on the lever. These bright colors tell a lot to a buyer by showing how many times the rifle in question has been racked. If the case color is dull or not even there at all you can safely assume its been hunted hard. Finding one with a lot of color tells that it was used very gently and Ive seen some that showed no color loss at all. Sometimes you wont even need a bore light when looking at a 99, if the case color is bright and shiny you can bet the farm that the bore is going to be just as nice.

Hopefully this shed some light on any questions you might have had, if you have anymore just get ahold of me here and Ill do my best to help you out. Just let me know what model and serial range were talking about and what the problem is. I never got into the rotor topic, mainly because they confuse me a lot. Rewinding the spring when reinstalling a rotor is a task Ive not yet perfected. Id ask that if its a broken part in your rifle that you get in touch with a qualified gunsmith to do the job. If its just a trigger spring or something easy and you get a little mixed up just drop me a line.
Submitted by Joe Koprash - aka Mad Dog

Savage Model 99
TypeLever Action, hammerless rifle
Place of originUnited States
Production history
DesignerArthur W. Savage
Designed1892–1899
ManufacturerSavage Arms Company
Produced1899–1998
VariantsModel 1892, Model 1895, Model 1899
Specifications
Cartridge.303 Savage, .32-40 Winchester, .300 Savage, .30-30 Winchester, .25-35 Winchester, .250 Savage, .22 Savage Hi-Power, .22-250 Remington, .243 Winchester, .308 Winchester, .358 Winchester, 7mm-08 Remington, .284 Winchester, .38-55 Winchester, .375 Winchester, .410 shotgun
ActionLever action, hammerless rifle
Feed systemRotary magazine, later models had a detachable box magazine.
SightsOpen iron sights, tang or receiver-mountedaperture sights. Later models had provisions for mounting rifle scopes

The Model 99, and its predecessor model 1895, is a series of hammerless lever action rifles created by the Savage Arms Company in Utica, New York. The Model 99 featured a unique rotary magazine.The rifle was extremely popular with big game hunters and was even issued to the Montreal Home Guard during the First World War.

History[edit]

Savage Model 99 Disassembly Instructions

The Savage 99 in Scientific American Volume 85 Number 10 (September 1901)

The immediate predecessor of the Model 1895, the Model 1892, was one of the contending rifle models offered to the U.S. Army when they were looking to replace the Springfield Model 1873 trapdoor rifle. The Krag–Jørgensen was chosen over the Savage and other models.[1] The Model 1892 was never put into production (and indeed pre-dated the actual establishment of the Savage Arms Company; the Model 1892 was a collaborative venture between Arthur Savage and Colt's Manufacturing Company), and instead it was further developed into the Model 1895. The Model 1895 musket in .30-40 Krag was the winner of an 1896 competition for a New York National Guard rifle contract, beating out the Winchester Model 1895.[2] Political controversy led to the cancellation of the contract and the New York National Guard was therefore equipped with obsolete single-shot Trapdoor Springfield rifles during the Spanish–American War.[3] Later refinements to the Model 1895 design led to the Model 1899, later simply shortened to the Model 99. In 1899, Savage offered to convert any existing Model 1895 rifle or carbine to Model 1899 configuration for a $5 fee.[4]

During World War I, the Montreal Home Guard was issued Model 99 rifles in 'musket' form, which incorporated a bayonet lug and military-style stock.[5] It is known as the Model 99D Musket. The Montreal Home Guard contract was for a total of 2,500 rifles, all of which are believed to have been delivered.[6] These rifles were chambered in .303 Savage, as altering the design for the Canadian standard .303 British Mk VII cartridge would have resulted in an unacceptable delay in delivery.[7] Guardsmen were responsible for purchasing their own rifles[5] and had the option of having their names stamped on the stock.[8] Many also chose to have their names engraved on the left side of the receiver.[9]Schnucks employment handbook free download.

Design[edit]

400-pound tiger taken by Reverend H. R. Caldwell using a Savage 99 chambered for .22 Savage Hi-Power

The Model 99 was preceded by the Model 1895, which was the first hammerless lever-action rifle.[10] The 1895, as well as the later Model 1899 and early Model 99, used a rotary magazine to hold the cartridges.[11] The rotating magazine uses a spring-loaded spool with grooves to hold the cartridges. The Savage 1899 took advantage of the spool to include a counter to indicate how many shots are left. The Model 99 continued using this system for many years, until its replacement with a detachable magazine.[12]

The rotating magazine design allowed the rifle to be one of the first lever-action rifles to use spitzer bullets. Previous lever-action rifles used tubular magazines, which placed cartridges of ammunition end to end. The pointed tips of a spitzer bullet would touch the primer of the cartridge in front of it, possibly causing an accidental discharge. Another novel safety feature was that, upon cocking the rifle, a small pin would protrude above the top receiver to indicate the rifle was cocked and ready to fire.[13]

Savage Model 99c Owners Manual Pdf

References[edit]

  1. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. pp. 189–190. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  2. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. pp. 190–193. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  3. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. pp. 193–194. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  4. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. p. 194. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  5. ^ abMercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. p. 202. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  6. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. p. 205. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  7. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. p. 203. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  8. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. p. 206. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  9. ^Mercaldo, Luke; Firestone, Adam; Vanderlinden, Anthony (2011). Allied Rifle Contracts in America. Wet Dog Publications. p. 207. ISBN0-9707997-7-2.
  10. ^'Savage Arms > History', Savage Arms.
  11. ^U.S. Patent 502,018, Magazine-Gun, Filing date: Apr 10, 1889, Issue date: July 25, 1893, Inventor: Arthur W. Savage
  12. ^U.S. Patent 611,284, Indicator for Firearms, Filing date: Jan. 17, 1893, Issue date: Sept. 27, 1898, Inventor: Arthur W. Savage
  13. ^U.S. Patent 634,034, Firearm, Filing date: Apr. 21, 1897, Issue date: Oct. 3, 1899, Inventor: Arthur W. Savage

Savage Model 99c Owners Manual Download

Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Savage_Model_99&oldid=968520612'